Resilience of natural resource-dependent communities

Many parts of the world have undergone rapid environmental, social and economic transformations in recent decades. This has included increased industrialization and urbanization, higher rates of population and economic growth, and the degradation of natural assets.  In this context, the sustainable natural resource management and policy challenges facing government are becoming increasingly complex, adaptive and ‘messy’.  Ultimately the resilience of any socio-ecological system is a function of the social actors and institutions involved in governing resource use and stewardship. This stream embraces exploratory and inter-disciplinary research approaches to deliver integrative insights that are applicable to the decision-making challenges being considered.

Current Research Projects


Modeling livelihood vulnerability in a complex social-ecological system under flood stress: A study of the North-Eastern flood plain communities of Bangladesh

H.M.T. Rahman (Ph.D. Candidate) with G.M. Hickey.

Funded by: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, (2014-16) and McGill University (2014-17).


Collective action in landscapes under rapid socio-ecological transformations: The role of institutional intermediaries in the sustainable governance of Bannerghatta National Park, India.

L. Jayaprakash (Ph.D. Student) with G.M. Hickey.

Funded by: Fonds de recherche du Québec - Nature et technologies (2014-17) and McGill University (2016-17).


 

Completed Research Projects


Assessing the role of social networks in agricultural cooperatives in the Niayes region of Senegal

G. Reed (M.Sc.) with G.M. Hickey.

Funded by: Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (2015-16) and McGill University (2015-16).


Understanding the social dimensions of tiger conservation in India

A. Rastogi (Ph.D.) with G.M. Hickey.

Funded by: Fonds de recherche sur la société et la culture (FQRSC), Quebec (2010-2014) and McGill University Internal Social Science and Humanities Research Grant (2009).


Wild edible plants (WEPs) and their contribution to food security: An analysis of household factors, access and policy in the semi-arid midlands of Kenya

S. Shumsky (MSc.) with G.M. Hickey.

Funded by: International Development Research Center (IDRC) and Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (2011-14).


Social factors affecting shark conservation on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef: A case study of Belize

S. Sabbagh (MSc.) with G.M. Hickey.

Funded by: McGill University Internal Social Science and Humanities Research Grant (2011).


Understanding the impacts of the 2007-08 Global Financial Crisis on Brazil's forest sector: A qualitative study

N. Canova (MSc.) with G.M. Hickey.

Funded by: McGill University Internal Social Science and Humanities Research Grant (2010).


 

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